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Back to School, Back to the Future

Wednesday, July 26, 2017   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Professional Educators of TN
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

BACK TO SCHOOL, BACK TO THE FUTURE  [View/Download PDF]

 

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, if you are a parent. For teachers, so much for the three-month vacation, huh? Most students are eager to get back to a schedule and see their friends. And for taxpayers, it is the announcement of a pending tax-free holiday (July 28 through July 30). Yes, Tennessee, it is back to school time.

 

The truth is, for most educators, public education has become a year-round activity. Even when class is not in session, educators are pursuing professional development opportunities, working in their classrooms, and gearing up for the upcoming school year. While educating most people to a minimal level and a few people to a very high level was sufficient a decade ago, today’s economy requires that all students receive a high-quality education. The demands society has placed on our public schools have increased exponentially. Educators really are touching the future.

 

Education can open doors to incredible opportunities that would have never been possible were it not for the education that one received while in school. With inconsistent and changing economic times, it is more important than ever for our nation’s children to receive high-quality education and training that will support children in developing the skills, the knowledge, and the dispositions that will allow them to be responsible, contributing members of their community and gain employment with a sustainable living wage.

 

Educators deserve more respect, and hopefully the Teacher Bill of Rights (that passed unanimously with our championship) moves us in that direction. Teachers need a real voice in education issues that impact them and their students, which we provide. Together, we must work every day to make our local schools, as well as our state, a better place for students to learn and for teachers to teach.

 

Educators welcome fair evaluation and feedback in order to improve what they teach and how they teach it, to improve student learning. But we must recognize that we may need different methods to assess student learning. One truth is evident: our members do not fear being held accountable for their own performance.

 

Educators face extraordinary challenges and too often they must confront societal or cultural problems that do not get discussed. Too many politicians give the impression our schools are failing. Their political solution is more standardization, accountability and increased testing without addressing the cultural issues.

 

Public education is not failing. For those who disagree, we welcome that debate. It is important to understand that the right to believe anything does not mean that anything anyone believes is right. When we disagree, we must disagree respectfully. There are times where we have a right and a duty to disagree with people, especially those policymakers who may not be on the front lines of public education but are elected to make decisions for everyone.

 

Kay McSpadden, a high school English teacher, points out: “Our middle-class and wealthy public school children are thriving. Poor children are struggling, not because their schools are failing, but because they come to school with all the well-documented handicaps that poverty imposes – poor prenatal care, developmental delays, hunger, illness, homelessness, emotional and mental illnesses, and so on.”

 

The faith community could play a critical part in addressing critical social issues across our state and country. Historically, it was men and women of faith who provided the first social services to the needy. In times of suffering, people often reach to religious leaders first. I would like to see every church and place of worship in this state pray for educators and students on a regular basis, especially as we head back to school. The faith community needs to find out what else they can do to help in our schools. I welcome those prayers for myself and my organization as well.

 

It takes everyone working together to improve public schools. And we must work with all stakeholders in public education, regardless of political party or perceived agenda. There is not a one size fits all solution, and no one person, one group or one political party has all the answers.

 

It is back to school time in Tennessee. We should all roll up our sleeves, as stakeholders and policymakers, to work and make public education work for all of our children. We need leadership and a clear expression of vision. Our future depends on it. Your future depends on it too.


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JC Bowman is the Executive Director of Professional Educators of Tennessee, a non-partisan teacher association headquartered in Brentwood, Tennessee. Permission to reprint in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that the author and the association are properly cited. For more information on this subject or any education issue please contact Professional Educators of Tennessee. To schedule an interview please contact Audrey Shores, Director of Communications, at 1-800-471-4867 ext.102.

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